Bio

Kyle V. Hiller is an editor specializing in young adult and middle grade fiction. He favors magical realism and coming-of-age narratives, and particularly seeks to amplify the voices of marginalized writers. Character development and nuance are the strengths of the Temple University alum who swears that if he ever grew up, he’d lose all his virtuosity as a purveyor of storytelling. Also, he loves his mom.

MSWL

Will take:

MG

  • Science Fiction
  • Horror
  • Contemporary
  • Adventure
  • Fantasy

YA

  • Magical Realism
  • Paranormal
  • Contemporary
  • Science Fiction
  • Suspense/Thriller
  • Horror
  • Romance
  • Adventure

NA

  • Contemporary
  • Science Fiction
  • Magical Realism
  • Romance
  • Adventure
  • Horror
  • Paranormal

I favor YA (especially magical realism), with MG and NA coming second and third respectively. I’m not opposed to taking A, but the story idea would have to be really unique, or I’d have to have some sort of relationship with the author. I’m just not as good at writing/editing characters over the age of 21. Maybe it’s because I’m still a 17/18yo at heart who’s stuck in senior year of high school? It was a very sensitive time…

I lean towards narratives with PoC, strong female protagonists/antagonists, and queer characters. I’m not into narratives that take place before the eighties. I’m nostalgic and I appreciate history, but I’m still relatively contemporary when it comes to genre fiction.

Absolutely no erotica. Please. I’ve got nothing against it—I’m all for sexual expression—but I have no interest in editing it.

Q&A

How can a manuscript’s first five pages make you sit up and take notice?

The opening paragraph is important, and while I don’t expect first paragraphs to be perfect, I want them to give me insight to the main character’s emotional state and the conflict therein. I want description that’s used as motif and ties in thematically with the character(s), indicates some sort of foreboding without giving it all away, and informs the reader in such a way that they are level with what the main character knows. Shrouding me in mystery for the sake of being mysterious is a big no-no—that’s baiting, and it’s potentially off-putting and disrespectful to your reader. Show me a slice of life and a slice of mind through the lens of your main character and her dilemma, and you’ll easily wrap me up. It all might sound harsh, but I’m easily impressed and engaged.

What can writers expect from working with you during #RevPit, including communication?

Abundant kindness peppered with a little bit of tough love when necessary. I kill darlings and eat them for breakfast, like they were the marshmallows in my Lucky Charms. But only because I seek the true potential in you, and I see it through words, and I believe in you. Everyone can be an excellent writer, I firmly believe that, and I will express my faith in you openly and amplify your voice however I can. I’m patient, forgiving, and empathetic, and that seeps into my tweets, calls and my emails.

What do you expect from writers during the #RevPit revision process, including communication?

I expect you to question yourself as a writer. I expect you to challenge yourself. I expect you to challenge me. I expect you to ask questions. I expect us to grow together. I expect your novel to shine. Because it can, and there’s no reason why we can’t make that happen together, hand in hand. Writing is the most difficult thing in the world (except for maybe practicing medicine) because it means exposing yourself, who you are, and the voice that expresses all that.

What hobbies do you have outside of writing and editing?

I’m quite the video game and anime nerd. I’ve always wanted to be a DJ, so I make video mixtapes in whatever free time I can carve out. I love cooking for friends and family. I’m practicing Japanese. I like running, too.

What was your favorite childhood book and what did you love about it?

This is such a hard question to answer. I couldn’t find a book that really spoke to me until I stumbled upon The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker when I was 26. I’ve always wanted to write and be a storyteller, but American classics never hit the spot. They hardly ever represented me, my upbringing, or my spirit. I read quite a bit, but I didn’t have a favorite book until later in life, and that’s hard to admit because it makes me look illegitimate. But I don’t really care, because in the end, that’s why we write, to tell the stories we wish were told that no one else can or has.

If I had to pick something, I’d say Harriet the Spy and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland left marks on me with their whimsy, but only retroactively. Legend of Zelda was what pushed me to be a writer, but that wasn’t a book, so I’m weird. It did send me on an immersive, grand adventure with a classic story that I could interact with.

Previous Editor Next Editor